Community impact: investing parents to drive student excellence

Bareerah Hoorani is a Teach For Pakistan Fellow in the 2012 Cohort. She teaches Science and English to class 7 and 8 in Karachi. Bareerah graduated from the Institute of Business Administration.

In this video she talks about how she invested the parents of a struggling student in her achievement at school and how this resulted in academic gains for the student.

Classrooms & Communities: What’s the situation in Karachi’s schools?

Myra Khan was previously a Programme Officer at Teach For Pakistan and now works in the Alumni Impact team.

One thing we have found consistently as an organisation working in the education sector in Pakistan is that there is not enough knowledge about the problems that are faced in under-resourced schools and low-income communities.

Questions we are often asked by prospective Fellows are: Where do our Fellows work? What do the classrooms look like? What infrastructure is available? Where will my students come from?

Below is a slideshow of pictures I have taken on visits to Teach For Pakistan’s placement schools in Karachi, and I hope to answer some of your questions by this. Also check out our locations to find out which communities we work with in  Karachi and Lahore.

(Click on any picture to start the slideshow.)

All photographs belong to Teach For Pakistan.

Classroom Impact: Making history in Roshni School

KHQ_7862Ahmed Rubbie Jamshed  is a Fellow in the 2012 cohort. He teaches Science and English to Grades 8 and 9 at Roshni School in Lahore. Ahmed has done BSc from the Lahore School of Economics.

“Out of a total of 40 students that took the science exam, over half the class scored A grades, 10 students scored B grades and only a handful scored lesser than that”

Ahmed is a grade 7 science teacher at Roshni School in Lahore. He feels fortunate to have taught in what he refers to as bipolar surroundings. He has taught in schools which are both predominantly conservative, but cater to opposite genders. MAO School in Karachi was an all boys’ school where he taught in the summer and the students were mostly Pashtuns. Roshni School in Lahore- where he has been teaching for over a year- is an all girls’ school where 90% of the students wear hijabs. The former school had problems of aggression and physical violence whereas the latter school has students who are under confident and taciturn.

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Ahmed says, “When I joined Roshni School, there was an ongoing problem with science classes because the school hadn’t had a proper science teacher in over 3 years. The students barely had any concepts and they were to appear for board exams of grade 8 in 5 months’ time. So the clock was ticking and I was given the responsibility of bringing their concepts to their respective grade levels and ultimately preparing 40 students for the board exams. It was a really hard task to balance the student learning outcomes from the national curriculum and the syllabus that the school was following but eventually I found the right mix. I held after school remediation, extra classes and even test sessions on Sundays. The foremost thing was the willingness of students to learn and their trust in me that I could guide them right”.

After a lot of effort on both parts, the students took the exams and were fairly happy with their performance. But when the results came out, nobody had expected what actually happened. Out of a total of 40 students that took the science exam, over half the class scored A grades, 10 students scored B grades and only a handful scored lesser than that.

This was by far the best result amongst all other subjects, and the best science result ever in Roshni School; in fact it was the best in all the schools in a 10 km radius.